Courses & Registration

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (05)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (09)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (06)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Language and Advertising
AS.050.107 (01)

Advertising pervades our culture; interactions with advertising are an unavoidable fact of modern life. This class uses tools from linguistics and cognitive science to analyze these interactions, and understand the impact of advertising on its viewers. A central theme is to treat ads as communicative acts, and explore the consequences -- what can theories of communication (from linguistics, psychology, and philosophy) tell us about ads? How do ads use central features of human cognition to accomplish their aims? Do ads manipulate, and if so, how successfully? The theories of communication we explore include Gricean pragmatics, theories of speech acts, linguistic theories of presuppositions, and more. Students will collect, analyze, and discuss advertisements in all mediums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/45
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (03)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (01)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (07)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (08)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (02)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (10)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Neuroscience: Cognitive
AS.050.203 (04)

This course surveys theory and research concerning how mental processes are carried out by the human brain. Currently a wide range of methods of probing the functioning brain are yielding insights into the nature of the relation between mental and neural events. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of both the physiological bases of the techniques and the issues involved in relating measures of brain activity to cognitive functioning. Methods surveyed include electrophysiological recording techniques such as EEG, ERP, single/multiple unit recording and MEG; functional imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI; and methods that involve lesioning or disrupting neural activity such as cortical stimulation, animal lesion studies, and the study of brain-damaged individuals. It’s strongly recommended that students have background in one of the following courses: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.105 OR AS.200.141.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Computational Psycholinguistics
AS.050.360 (01)

This course is an introduction to the study of human language comprehension and acquisition from a computational perspective. We will cover both major empirical findings and computational models that aim to account for these findings. The course will not assume significant prior knowledge in psycholinguistics or computational linguistics; however, some programming background is desirable. Also offered as AS.050.660.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG, COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY, BEHB-BIOBEH

Topics in Music Cognition
AS.376.372 (01)

This course explores the similarities and differences between music and language, the effects of musical training on cognitive development, and the expressive power of music, with an introduction to music and its role in film. We will read relevant research and theory on these topics from cognitive science, neuroscience, psychology, musicology, and philosophical perspectives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY

Cognitive Neuropsychology of Visual Perception: The Malfunctioning Visual Brain
AS.050.315 (01)

When we think about our ability to see, we tend to think about our eyes, but in fact vision happens mostly in the brain. This course explores the remarkable perceptual deficits that occur when the visual regions of the brain are damaged or fail to develop normally, focusing on what these perceptual malfunctions tell us about normal visual perception. Topics include visual system anatomy and physiology; functional specialization in the lower visual system as revealed by cerebral achromatopsia (color blindness resulting from brain damage) and akinetopsia (impaired motion perception); cortical plasticity in the visual system; spatial deficits in perception and action; and the implications of high-level visual deficits, including prosopagnosia (impaired face recognition), Charles Bonnet syndrome (complex visual hallucinations in blind areas of the visual field), blindsight (accurate responding to visual stimuli despite apparent inability to see them), and aphantasia (lack of visual imagery).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/50
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY, BEHB-SOCSCI, NEUR-CG, BEHB-BIOBEH

Syntax I
AS.050.320 (01)

Introduces the basic methods and means of analysis used in contemporary syntax investigations, practicing with data from different languages. Also offered as AS.050.620.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING

Practicum in Language Disorders-Community Based Learning
AS.050.318 (01)

This course provides the opportunity to learn about adult aphasias, language disorders which are one of the most common consequences of stroke. You will receive training in supportive communication techniques and work as a communication partner with an individual with aphasia for two hours per week. Three class meetings for orientation and reading assignments will be held on campus; training and practicum will be conducted at a local aphasia support center. Independent mode of transportation required. Co-listed as AS.080.400 in Neuroscience. Additional information can be found on the Department of Neuroscience's website: http://krieger.jhu.edu/neuroscience/academics/practicums/practicum-in-language-disorders. Interested students should contact the instructor. Find out more about the practicum site at https://www.leagueforpeople.org/scale.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 1/4
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Foundations of Neural Network Theory
AS.050.372 (01)

Introduction to continuous mathematics for cognitive science, with applications to biological and cognitive network models: real and complex numbers, differential and integral multi-variable calculus, linear algebra, dynamical systems, numerical optimization. Also offered as AS.050.672.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP

Phonology I
AS.050.325 (01)

An introduction to the basic principles underlying the mental representation and manipulation of language sounds and their relation to human perception and vocal articulation: how units of sound are both decomposable into elementary features and combined to form larger structures like syllables and words. The role of rules and constraints in a formal theory of phonological competence and in accounting for the range of variation among the world’s languages. Also offered as AS.050.625.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/40
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING, BEHB-SOCSCI

Bilingualism
AS.050.206 (01)

Do children get confused when they grow up exposed to more than one language? Is it possible to forget one’s native language? Are the first and second language processed in different areas of the brain? How does brain damage impact the different languages of a polyglot? Does knowing a second language affect non-linguistic cognitive processing? This course will address questions such as these through an exploration of mental and neural processes underlying bilingual and multilingual language processing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.050.203 (05)Neuroscience: CognitiveTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Rapp, Brenda C, StaffMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.203 (09)Neuroscience: CognitiveT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Litovsky, Celia P, Rapp, Brenda CMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.203 (06)Neuroscience: CognitiveT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Rapp, Brenda C, Tao, YuanMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.107 (01)Language and AdvertisingMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMRawlins, KyleKrieger 111COGS-LING
AS.050.203 (03)Neuroscience: CognitiveTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Neophytou, Kyriaki, Rapp, Brenda CMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.203 (01)Neuroscience: CognitiveTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Rapp, Brenda C, Tao, YuanMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.203 (07)Neuroscience: CognitiveT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Li, Shi Pui, Rapp, Brenda CMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.203 (08)Neuroscience: CognitiveT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Neophytou, Kyriaki, Rapp, Brenda CMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.203 (02)Neuroscience: CognitiveTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Li, Shi Pui, Rapp, Brenda CMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.203 (10)Neuroscience: CognitiveT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Rapp, Brenda C, StaffMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.203 (04)Neuroscience: CognitiveTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBonner, Michael, Litovsky, Celia P, Rapp, Brenda CMudd 26COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.360 (01)Computational PsycholinguisticsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLinzen, TalKrieger 111COGS-COMPCG, COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.376.372 (01)Topics in Music CognitionTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMLopez-Gonzalez, MonicaShaffer 202COGS-COGPSY
AS.050.315 (01)Cognitive Neuropsychology of Visual Perception: The Malfunctioning Visual BrainTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMcCloskey, Michael EAmes 234COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY, BEHB-SOCSCI, NEUR-CG, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.050.320 (01)Syntax ITTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMLegendre, GeraldineKrieger 111COGS-LING
AS.050.318 (01)Practicum in Language Disorders-Community Based LearningRapp, Brenda C 
AS.050.372 (01)Foundations of Neural Network TheoryMWF 3:00PM - 4:15PMSmolensky, PaulKrieger 134ACOGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP
AS.050.325 (01)Phonology IMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMWilson, ColinKrieger 111COGS-LING, BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.050.206 (01)BilingualismT 3:00PM - 5:30PMYarmolinskaya, Julia SKrieger 111COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
AS.050.332 (01)

In-depth examination of the current literature on cognitive development in the context of developmental cognitive neuroscience. Please see course prerequisites. Meets with AS.050.632.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Practicum in Language Disorders- Community Based Learning
AS.050.318 (01)

This course provides the opportunity to learn about adult aphasias, language disorders which are one of the most common consequences of stroke. You will receive training in supportive communication techniques and work as a communication partner with an individual with aphasia for two hours per week. Three class meetings for orientation and reading assignments will be held on campus; training and practicum will be conducted at a local aphasia support center. Transportation required. Colisted with Neuroscience (AS.080.400). Additional information can be found on http://krieger.jhu.edu/neuroscience/academics/practicums/practicum-in-language-disorders, the Department of Neuroscience's Website. Find out more on the practicum location at http://www.scalebaltimore.org, SCALE Baltimore.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/3
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Bilingualism
AS.050.206 (01)

Do children get confused when they grow up exposed to more than one language? Is it possible to forget one’s native language? Are the first and second language processed in different areas of the brain? How does brain damage impact the different languages of a polyglot? Does knowing a second language affect non-linguistic cognitive processing? This course will address questions such as these through an exploration of mental and neural processes underlying bilingual and multilingual language processing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-LING

Language Acquisition
AS.050.348 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the fields of first and second language acquisition by looking at questions such as the following: Can the grammar of a native language be learned solely on the basis of noticing statistical correlations among words? How does native language acquisition explain — or is explained by — the universal properties, shared by all languages, of words and grammars? How does being exposed to multiple languages from birth affect language acquisition and what happens when a child is not exposed to any language early in life? Does the same cognitive mechanism guide language learning in children and adults? What factors account for individual differences in ease and ultimate attainment when a second language is learned later in life? Is it possible to become indistinguishable from a native speaker in a foreign language? What changes take place in the brain when a new language is learned? Also offered as AS.050.648.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY

Decoding the Brain: Multivariate Analysis in Cognitive Neuroscience
AS.050.346 (01)

Neural decoding through Machine Learning has become an ever-important tool for neuroscientists to understand how the brain processes information. This course introduces students to this exciting field with seminar-style lectures and hands-on practice sessions. The course will be organized around a number of corner-stone applications of neural decoding in Cognitive Neuroscience, topics include face recognition, concept knowledge representation, and bridging language model and the brain. In the practice sessions, students will learn to analyze actual neuroimaging data and replicate the published findings with off-the-shelf software. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the basic methods of neural decoding, and acquire hands-on experience of data analysis. Prior programming knowledge is not required and programming skill per se is not part of the evaluation, yet students are expected to familiarize themselves with the scripting interface and understand the basics through the practice sessions. If an interested student has taken a statistics course comparable to one of the listed prerequisite courses, contact the instructor and include the course number and description.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/17
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computational Cognitive Science
AS.050.202 (01)

How does the mind work? Cognitive science addresses this question from a multidiscliplinary perspective, drawing upon methods and ideas from psychology, neurophysiology, neuroscience, philosophy, linguistics, and computer science. Within this framework, computational cognitive science has two related goals. The first is to create computational models of human cognition, computer programs that simulate certain aspects of the mind. The second is to understand how to produce intelligent behavior in machines, taking cues from humans. The computational frameworks we will discuss include symbolic structured representations, probabilistic inference and artificial neural networks, as applied to concept learning, language and vision. While this class does not have formal prerequisites, some programming experience (e.g., AS 250.205 Introduction to Computing or equivalent) and mathematical preparation (e.g., AS.110.107 Calculus II or equivalent) are essential. An optional, hands-on lab (AS.050.212) is offered to supplement this course. It is highly recommended that students with less extensive computational and mathematical experience register for this lab.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/50
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Cognitive Neuropsychology
AS.050.105 (01)

When the brain is damaged or fails to develop normally, even the most basic cognitive abilities (such as the ability to understand words, or perceive objects) may be disrupted, often in remarkable ways. This course explores a wide range of cognitive deficits, focusing on what these deficits can tell us about how the normal brain works. Topics include brain anatomy and causes of brain damage, reading and spelling deficits, unilateral spatial neglect, hemispheric disconnection, cortical plasticity, and visual perception of location and orientation. Students read primary sources: journal articles that report deficits and discuss their implications.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 81/125
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Introduction to Computational Cognitive Science Lab
AS.050.212 (01)

This course is a hands-on lab supplement for Introduction to Computational Cognitive Science. While this lab is optional, it is highly recommended to students with less extensive computational and mathematical experience.

  • Credits: 0.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 41/50
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Language and Mind
AS.050.102 (01)

Introductory course dealing with theory, methods, and current research topics in the study of language as a component of the mind. What it is to "know" a language: components of linguistic knowledge (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) and the course of language acquisition. How linguistic knowledge is put to use: language and the brain and linguistic processing in various domains. Cross-listed with Neuroscience and Psychology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 80/140
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY

Computational Psycholinguistics
AS.050.360 (01)

How do we understand and produce sentences in a language we speak? How do we acquire the knowledge that underlies this ability? Computational psycholinguistics seeks to address these questions using a combination of two approaches: computational models, which aim to replicate the processes that take place in the human mind; and human experiments, which are designed to test those models. The perspective we will take in this class is that the models and experimental paradigms do not only advance our understanding of the cognitive science, but can also help us advance artificial intelligence and language technologies. While computational psycholinguistics spans all levels of linguistic structure, from speech to discourse, our focus in this class will be at the level of the sentence (syntax and semantics). The course will assume familiarity with programming and computational modeling frameworks in cognitive science, as covered by Introduction to Computational Cognitive Science or equivalent. Also offered as AS.050.660. An optional, hands-on lab (AS.050.361) is offered to supplement this course. It is highly recommended that students with less extensive computational and mathematical experience register for this lab.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-LING, COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CP

Computational Psycholinguistics Lab
AS.050.361 (01)

This course is an optional hands-on lab supplement for Computational Psycholinguistics. While this lab is optional, it is highly recommended to students with less extensive computational and mathematical experience.

  • Credits: 0.50
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 32/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Probabilistic Models of the Visual Cortex
AS.050.375 (01)

The course gives an introduction to computational models of the mammalian visual cortex. It covers topics in low-, mid-, and high-level vision. It briefly discusses the relevant evidence from anatomy, electrophysiology, imaging (e.g., fMRI), and psychophysics. It concentrates on mathematical modeling of these phenomena taking into account recent progress in probabilistic models of computer vision and developments in machine learning, such as deep networks.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST, NEUR-CP, CSCI-APPL

Decoding the Brain: Multivariate Analysis in Cognitive Neuroscience
AS.050.346 (02)

Neural decoding through Machine Learning has become an ever-important tool for neuroscientists to understand how the brain processes information. This course introduces students to this exciting field with seminar-style lectures and hands-on practice sessions. The course will be organized around a number of corner-stone applications of neural decoding in Cognitive Neuroscience, topics include face recognition, concept knowledge representation, and bridging language model and the brain. In the practice sessions, students will learn to analyze actual neuroimaging data and replicate the published findings with off-the-shelf software. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the basic methods of neural decoding, and acquire hands-on experience of data analysis. Prior programming knowledge is not required and programming skill per se is not part of the evaluation, yet students are expected to familiarize themselves with the scripting interface and understand the basics through the practice sessions. If an interested student has taken a statistics course comparable to one of the listed prerequisite courses, contact the instructor and include the course number and description.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/17
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Music Cognition
AS.376.371 (01)

What underlies our aesthetic response to music? How and why are we able to identify certain sounds as music? To what extent are music and natural language similar? What is it about music that evokes such powerful emotions such as happiness and sadness? What is unique to musical creativity? Examining such questions from cognitive science, neuroscience, psychology, and philosophical perspectives, this course explores relevant research and theory in the emerging domain of music perception and cognition. Students will complete a final research paper on the topic of their choice that integrates the course material.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.050.332 (01)Developmental Cognitive NeuroscienceMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMLandau, BarbaraKrieger 134ACOGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.318 (01)Practicum in Language Disorders- Community Based LearningRapp, Brenda C 
AS.050.206 (01)BilingualismTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMYarmolinskaya, Julia SGilman 132COGS-COGPSY, COGS-LING
AS.050.348 (01)Language AcquisitionTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMYarmolinskaya, Julia SGilman 50COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY
AS.050.346 (01)Decoding the Brain: Multivariate Analysis in Cognitive NeuroscienceM 3:00PM - 5:30PMTao, YuanKrieger 307COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COMPCG
AS.050.202 (01)Introduction to Computational Cognitive ScienceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLinzen, TalKrieger 111COGS-COMPCG
AS.050.105 (01)Introduction to Cognitive NeuropsychologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMcCloskey, Michael EMergenthaler 111COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.212 (01)Introduction to Computational Cognitive Science LabF 2:15PM - 3:30PMStaffKrieger 111
AS.050.102 (01)Language and MindMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMWilson, ColinGilman 50COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY
AS.050.360 (01)Computational PsycholinguisticsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMLinzen, TalKrieger 111COGS-COGPSY, COGS-LING, COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CP
AS.050.361 (01)Computational Psycholinguistics LabF 3:45PM - 5:00PMStaffKrieger 111
AS.050.375 (01)Probabilistic Models of the Visual CortexTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMYuille, Alan LKrieger 111COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST, NEUR-CP, CSCI-APPL
AS.050.346 (02)Decoding the Brain: Multivariate Analysis in Cognitive NeuroscienceT 3:00PM - 5:30PMTao, YuanKrieger 307COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COMPCG
AS.376.371 (01)Introduction to Music CognitionT 9:00AM - 11:30AMLopez-Gonzalez, MonicaMattin Center 101COGS-COGPSY