Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of recently offered courses and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found on the SIS website.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Language and Mind
AS.050.102 (01)

Introductory course dealing with theory, methods, and current research topics in the study of language as a component of the mind. What it is to "know" a language: components of linguistic knowledge (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) and the course of language acquisition. How linguistic knowledge is put to use: language and the brain and linguistic processing in various domains.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Yarmolinskaya, Julia S
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/125
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY

Introduction to Cognitive Neuropsychology
AS.050.105 (01)

When the brain is damaged or fails to develop normally, even the most basic cognitive abilities (such as the ability to understand words, or perceive objects) may be disrupted, often in remarkable ways. This course explores a wide range of cognitive deficits, focusing on what these deficits can tell us about how the normal brain works. Topics include brain anatomy and causes of brain damage, reading and spelling deficits, unilateral spatial neglect, hemispheric disconnection, cortical plasticity, and visual perception of location and orientation. Students read primary sources: journal articles that report deficits and discuss their implications.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: McCloskey, Michael E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 50/125
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Speech & Voice
AS.050.135 (01)

Course on human speech production and perception, covering topics including anatomy and physiology of the vocal tract, phonetic analysis, language acquisition and impairments, and speech technologies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Wilson, Colin
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING

Neurolinguistics
AS.050.236 (01)

This course provides an introductory survey of the cognitive neuroscience of language – a multidisciplinary field in the intersection of Linguistics, Psycholinguistics, and Neuroscience. We will explore current research on the neural bases of the perception, production, and acquisition or human language in neuro-typical and impaired individuals.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Yarmolinskaya, Julia S
  • Room: Krieger 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Semantics I
AS.050.317 (01)

This is an introduction to the study of meaning in natural language. We address the conceptual and empirical issues in semantic theory and introduce some formal machinery that has been developed to deal with such problems. After discussing foundational questions, we turn to formal semantics and pragmatics, as well as their interfaces with syntax and the lexicon. Specific topics include presupposition, type-driven composition, quantification, lexical aspect, argument structure, and lexical representations of meaning.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Rawlins, Kyle
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING

Practicum in Language Disorders- Community Based Learning
AS.050.318 (01)

This course provides the opportunity to learn about adult aphasias, language disorders which are one of the most common consequences of stroke. You will receive training in supportive communication techniques and work as a communication partner with an individual with aphasia for two hours per week. Three class meetings for orientation and reading assignments will be held on campus; training and practicum will be conducted at a local aphasia support center. Transportation required. Colisted with Neuroscience (AS.080.400). Additional information can be found on http://krieger.jhu.edu/neuroscience/academics/practicums/practicum-in-language-disorders, the Department of Neuroscience's Website. Find out more on the practicum location at http://www.scalebaltimore.org, SCALE Baltimore.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Rapp, Brenda C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/3
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

First Language Acquisition
AS.050.348 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the fields of first and second language acquisition by looking at questions such as the following: Can the grammar of a native language be learned solely on the basis of noticing statistical correlations among words? How does native language acquisition explain — or is explained by — the universal properties, shared by all languages, of words and grammars? How does being exposed to multiple languages from birth affect language acquisition and what happens when a child is not exposed to any language early in life? Does the same cognitive mechanism guide language learning in children and adults? What factors account for individual differences in ease and ultimate attainment when a second language is learned later in life? Is it possible to become indistinguishable from a native speaker in a foreign language? What changes take place in the brain when a new language is learned? Also offered as AS.050.648.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Yarmolinskaya, Julia S
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY

Applying Cognitive Neuroscience to Artificial Intelligence Part I
AS.050.352 (01)

As a result of greater computing power and Big Data, artificial intelligence (AI) is rapidly improving for well-defined tasks and narrow intelligence. Moreover, it has entered all industries in a myriad of ways. But will AI ever have human-like general intelligence? What does humanlike general intelligence even mean? Why should we even care? This course is designed to answer these complex questions by giving students working knowledge of the underlying principles and mechanisms of human behavior and cognition, and how they may be applied to solving current and rising industry challenges. Key topics to be addressed will include vision, audition, language, learning, emotion and social cognition, creativity, and consciousness. Each topic addressed will cover latest advancements within cognitive neuroscience, with relevant applied case studies. Students will apply learned topics to a final group research project on the topic of their choice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica
  • Room: Krieger 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO, COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, BEHB-BIOBEH

Language & Thought
AS.050.358 (01)

Have you ever wondered about the relationships between language and thought? Philosophers, linguists, psychologists, evolutionary theorists and cognitive scientists have too and this course will survey the current thinking on this matter. Classical papers such as those by Whorf and Sapir, more recent philosophical papers by people such as Fodor and Dennett, and recent empirical work by linguists and psycholingists on the relationship between language and thinking in development and in adults will be covered. Discussions will focus on the theoretically possible relationships between language and thought and the empirical data that speak to these. Juniors and seniors only. Freshmen and sophomores by permission of instructor only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Landau, Barbara
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COGPSY, COGS-LING

Probabilistic Models of the Visual Cortex
AS.050.375 (01)

The course gives an introduction to computational models of the mammalian visual cortex. It covers topics in low-, mid-, and high-level vision. It briefly discusses the relevant evidence from anatomy, electrophysiology, imaging (e.g., fMRI), and psychophysics. It concentrates on mathematical modeling of these phenomena taking into account recent progress in probabilistic models of computer vision and developments in machine learning, such as deep networks. Required Background: Calculus I and experience in a programming language (Python preferred).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Yuille, Alan L
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 19/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST, NEUR-CP, CSCI-APPL

Introduction to Music Cognition
AS.376.371 (01)

What underlies our aesthetic response to music? How and why are we able to identify certain sounds as music? To what extent are music and natural language similar? What is it about music that evokes such powerful emotions such as happiness and sadness? What is unique to musical creativity? Examining such questions from cognitive science, neuroscience, psychology, and philosophical perspectives, this course explores relevant research and theory in the emerging domain of music perception and cognition. Students will complete a final research paper on the topic of their choice that integrates the course material.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 9:00AM - 11:30AM
  • Instructor: Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica
  • Room: Krieger 134A
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST

Introduction to Music Cognition
AS.376.371 (02)

What underlies our aesthetic response to music? How and why are we able to identify certain sounds as music? To what extent are music and natural language similar? What is it about music that evokes such powerful emotions such as happiness and sadness? What is unique to musical creativity? Examining such questions from cognitive science, neuroscience, psychology, and philosophical perspectives, this course explores relevant research and theory in the emerging domain of music perception and cognition. Students will complete a final research paper on the topic of their choice that integrates the course material.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 5:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica
  • Room: Shriver Hall 028G
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.050.102 (01)Language and MindTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMYarmolinskaya, Julia S COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY
AS.050.105 (01)Introduction to Cognitive NeuropsychologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMcCloskey, Michael E COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.135 (01)Speech & VoiceMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMWilson, ColinGilman 313COGS-LING
AS.050.236 (01)NeurolinguisticsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMYarmolinskaya, Julia SKrieger 111BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.317 (01)Semantics IMW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMRawlins, KyleHodson 203COGS-LING
AS.050.318 (01)Practicum in Language Disorders- Community Based LearningRapp, Brenda C CSC-CE
AS.050.348 (01)First Language AcquisitionTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMYarmolinskaya, Julia SKrieger LavertyCOGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY
AS.050.352 (01)Applying Cognitive Neuroscience to Artificial Intelligence Part IMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMLopez-Gonzalez, MonicaKrieger 111COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO, COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.050.358 (01)Language & ThoughtW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLandau, BarbaraHodson 316BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COGPSY, COGS-LING
AS.050.375 (01)Probabilistic Models of the Visual CortexTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMYuille, Alan LKrieger 205COGS-COMPCG, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST, NEUR-CP, CSCI-APPL
AS.376.371 (01)Introduction to Music CognitionT 9:00AM - 11:30AMLopez-Gonzalez, MonicaKrieger 134ACOGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST
AS.376.371 (02)Introduction to Music CognitionM 5:00PM - 7:30PMLopez-Gonzalez, MonicaShriver Hall 028GCOGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST